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. that means palestinians have gained more powers but u.s. and isiseli leaders argue it throws up more barriers on the road to peace. >> reporter: it was a historic day for palestinians. before the vote palestinians president made his last plea to gain the support of delegation from u.n. member states. >> translator: i am hoping everyone's decision will give a birth certificate to the state of palestine. >> the assembly voted on a resolution to award palstines nonmember state. >> the result of the voting is as follows. in favor, 138. opposed, 9. abstentions, 41. >> reporter: an overwhelming majority voted in favor. among the minority who voted against resolution were israel and the united states. they argue that the palestine state hood should be negotiated between the two parties first. thursday's vote was a significant victory for the palestinians after their bid to gain full u.n. membership was shelved in the security council. being recognized as a state pal stain my exercise its new right to investigate alleged war crimes by israel. critics say it would the detrimental. it remains to be see
to recognize palestine as a non-member state. palestinians celebrated, but the u.s. says it is an obstacle to peace talks. nbc's danielle lee joins us with those details. danielle, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. it's a bit of a loss for the u.s. and israel. the peer is that yesterday's vote will make palestine less likely to negotiate a peace agreement with israel moving forward. yesterday the united nations overwhelmingly voted to upgrade palestine's status to a non-member state and that could allow them to go after israel in criminal court which could delay or complicate peace talks in an effort towards forming two independent states of palestine and israel moving forward. u.n. ambassador susan rice called the vote a setback. the u.s. had threatened funding in the west bank in the hopes of preventing it. now rice says that the only way to truly form an independent palestinian state is through direct negotiations with israel. she says that is something the u.s. is committed to making happen. despite those comments, palestinians took to the streets yesterday in a ste
of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a significant part of u.s. diplomacy and what we try to get governments to do in terms of the way they treat their own people. during the iranian revolution, the iranian green revolution in 2009, those big street protests against ahmadinejad, remember that summer of big protests there? remember how the u.s. press called that the twitter revolution? twitter was not the reason those protests happened in iran that summer, but it did turn out to be an important tool that activists and regular iranians used to communicate to each other about that giant protest movement that was so threatening to the government there. when twitter was planning a totally unrelated shutdown for technical reasons around the time of those big protests in iran, the u.s. government intervened and asked the company to please delay that planned outage to another time when it would not crimp iranians' ability to use that tool. and twitter agreed. twitter did delay that planned service outage. with this shutdown of the whole internet in all of syria today, it's
classes this year. >> tom: the u.s. economy was hotter than first thought this summer. in the newest data on the gross domestic product, the economy grew in the third quarter at its fastest pace of the year. the revised report said the economy grew at a 2.7% clip. that's well above the previously reported 2% growth. adding fuel was restocking inventories, which is not expected to continue. higher federal government spending and stronger u.s. exports also helped. the impact super-storm sandy has had on the job market seems to be dissipating. 23,000 fewer americans filed for first-time unemployment benefits during thanksgiving week compared to a week earlier. the total was 393,000. it had jumped to over 400,000 in the weeks following the storm. still, we saw just modest gains on wall street today-- the dow rose 36 points, the nasdaq was up 20, and the s&p 500 added six. >> tom: the roster of companies announcing special one-time paydays for their shareholders continued growing today. taxes on stock dividends are currently set at 15%. but with no deal on the fiscal cliff, dividends will be t
on december 7th. they priced the range at the moment of their indicative range. it will be a 3.1 u.s. billion dollar ipo and that would be hong kong's largest in about two years. looking at some of the other markets, the kospi finished with somes losses down 0.1%. asx finishing up 0.6%. let's get over to the november performances because it was a pretty good showing for the month. nikkei of course the outperformer. kelly mentioned the yen. it has been weakening against the u.s. dollar and that has been providing a lot of support. also directly related to politics in japan. this has been in focus over the last month or so. opposition leader expected to be the next prime minister when the country votes. so he has been talking about a lot of aggressive monetary easing and talking about an inflation target of about 2%. so stocks have really been on a roll. the kospi finishing up with just about 1.1% gain in november. we have the asx finishing just slightly lower about a quarter of a percent. and the hang seng continues to win finishing i believe a third month of gains up 1.8% in the month of nove
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
here at the u.n., it is the u.s. and israel leading against the rest of the world. a u.n. vote on the official membership of palestinians, the vote that the u.s. and israel have been spending a long time trying to stop. the question is, what effect will this have on anything approaching peace in that region? our chief correspondent affairs, andrea mitchell. >> reporter: good evening, on the 65th anniversary of the u.n. giving israel the land to become a state, they voted overwhelmingly to recognize the palestinians, but only as an observer state. and a non-voting official state it is a step for nationhood, and a potential flash place for the middle east. hours earlier, they were already celebrating across the west bank. in ramallah, he made a pizza with tomatoes, olives, and spinach, representing the palestinian flag >> this is what we longed for over 60 years, it is about time a flag that today's u.n. actions will still not make palestine a nation. >> the united nations general assembly is here to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> reporter:
questions. >> monday the head of u.s. africa command is scheduled to speak at george washington university at the rising threat of terrorism. they will face questions about the growing presence of al-qaeda as well as the military could have done more in benghazi attack on 9/11. >> bret: his name came up a lot. thank you. what is the best country in the world to be from? the answer will surprise you. that is later in the grapevine. up next, a lot of people in egypt are not happy with their country's president. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with
a historic vote at the united nations. it's a step the u.s. is calling unfortunate and counterproductive. >>> new this morning, sex case settled. the former imf chief reaches a deal with the hotel maid who had accused him of rape in a new york hotel room. >>> and stormy surf. they are hanging ten and loving the pineapple express in southern california. but further north, the snow is now being measured in feet. >>> and good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm sunny hostin, in for paula faris. we begin with mystery winners of the biggest powerball payday ever. this morning, we still don't know for sure who will split the $587 million jackpot. >> it's not us, though. but it already looks like we have gotten a glimpse of one of the two winners, just as he learned the good news himself. abc's tahman bradley joins us from washington with the latest. certainly, this picture tells the story. good morning, tahman. >> reporter: oh, this is remarkable stuff, rob and sunny. now, the lottery officials are tight-lipped. but speculation is growing. a missouri man has co
as early as tomorrow. the u.s. supreme court is scheduled to meet and decide whether or not to review proposition 8. the voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage. lower courts have already ruled that that ban is unconstitutional. tonight, kron4's dan kerman looks at the options before the high court and what they mean for californians. >> if the u.s. supreme court refuses to review the case, you can expect a lot more ceremony like this. >> if they deny review, that'll be the end for the california, why. in other words, same-sex marriage will be lawful. >> marriages would be able to begin once the 9th circuit issues a mandate. the 9th circuit is expected to issue that mandate quickly, possibly within a week. but uc hastings law professor rory little says he's hopeful the supreme court will review this case. >> it'd be great if they denied it and same-sex marriage went forward two weeks from now. but the national question, should the constitution permit the banning of same-sex marriage, there's a lot of disuniformity. the supreme court's job is to settle that! so i think the right result
is going to be joining us. (cheers and applause) we begin tonight with the attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. it was a tragic situation where american lives were lost and in the three months since the attack, legitimate questions of adequate embassy security, americas overall advocacy in fighting the war on terror and the intricate dance between national security confidentiality and the public's right to know have all been distilled down, thrown out and replaced with this one urgent conclusion concerning current u.s. ambassador to united nations susan rice. >> i will do everything in my power to black her from being the united states secretary of state. she's not qualified. >> jon: that's senator john mccain continuing his seven year quest to negate every good thing he'd ever done prior to that. (laughter) this time leading the charge to preempt as an of now hypothetical obama nomination for secretary of state to replace hillary clinton. why? because five days after the benghazi attacks, susan rice went on the sunday talk shows and said this: . >> the best assessment we ha
the key to u.s. energy independence. a new study says absolutely not. is the controversial outlook right? we'll drill down on that one. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at the day's market headlines. stocks look exhausted after a week of fiscal cliff fueled volatility. the major indices swayed between positive and negative territory closing the day mixed. the dow eked out three points, three. while closing out the month of november down half a percent. >>> you know the global economy is in trouble when even taco bell and kfc have trouble making money, right? shares of their parent company yum! brands dove nearly 10% today. the company warned fourth quarter sales in china, their single best market, would likely slide. >>> u.s. consumer spending fell for the first time since may. the 0.2% decline in october partially being blamed on the impact of superstorm sandy. why not. >>> starting off tonight, taxes are the talk of the town and have been for daze. seems like much of the conversation is focused on the wealthy to get them to pay more.
news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the u.s. economy is looking significantly stronger tonight than it of did just a short while ago. have a look. the government revised its estimate of third quarter growth from 2% to 2.7. that means the economy was growing more than twice as fast in the third quarter as it was in the second when growth was just 1.3%. so, are we turning a corner or is this a one-quarter wonder? we asked anthony mason to find out. >> reporter: business is looking rosy at the internet retailer wine.com. new york general manager chris boone is expecting a strong holiday season. in from thanksgiving on, we've got our running shoes on, and we're running and hustling. >> reporter: wine.com just had a huge third quarter. sales jumped 15%, and the company recently expanded into a new warehouse. >> the old warehouse we had was 15,000 square feet. this current one is 30,000. it's great for us, it's great for business, and i'm happy to ae the growth. >> reporter: across the u.s., economic signals are improving. pending home sales, which track contract signings, ju
investing opportunities for next year, the u.s. ranked number 1 for the 8th quarter in a row. china came in second, and europe was considered the worst for returns. for those holding out hope for a second life for twinkies, ho- hos and ding-dongs, there's encouraging news. hostess says it is in talks with more than 100 interested buyers. at the same time, hostess is seeking approval in banruptcy court to pay its top executives $1.8 billion in bonuses to retain them during the year-long wind- down process. union reps are asking the judge to bring in an independent group to oversee that process. citigroup is doing some trimming this holiday season. according to reports, the big bank plans to cut 150 jobs and shrink bonuses by up to 10%. the layoffs will affect people working on the trading and investment side of citigroup. sources say people who are top performers won't be affected. several wall street firms have fired employees in cost-cutting moves to deal with new rules meant to prevent another financial crisis. some coffee fans may call starbucks, "sevenbucks." that's how much it'll co
voted to recognize palestine as a nonmember state. palestinians celebrated, but the u.s. says it's an obstacle to peace talks. nbc's danielle leigh joins us from washington with the details. danielle, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, lynn. a bit of a loss for israel. the vote feared to make palestine less likely to negotiate a peace deal directly with israel. the united nations overwhelmingly voted to upgrade palestine's status to a nonmember state, and that allows them to go after israel and international court which could delay or complicate any efforts at forming an agreement that forms two independent states of palestine and israel. ambassador susan rice said she was disappointed by the vote. the u.s. had threatened funding in the west bank in the hopes of preventing it. and rice says that the only way to truly form an independent state of palestine is through direct talks with israel, something the u.s. is committed to. despite those words, palestinians took to the streets celebrating what they consider a victory and a step toward their own independence. the r
what the u.s. military is doing when we respond to a disaster. we are there to support. we are supporting and not the supported commander. >> i think one of the things that was a revelation this year, as we've had a chance to do more, i think there is a discovery of how much more really needs to be done. i'm not sure if we quite know yet collectively what we do not yet know in terms of what will be necessary to have an effective response. the comments that we have and the work that we've done over the last couple of months of putting the pieces together just get the lcac ashore, the helicopterses in to conduct an exercise up here last summer reveals that there's a lot more work that needs to be done if this is to be smooth. it's complex. it's hard. frankly, the military piece is going to be relatively easy. we'll be able to sort for ourselves relatively fast because we've got a pretty good sight picture on who we are and what we are w dough and how we fit together. i think one of the real challenges, my observation, is civil authorities getting a full grip on everything tha
overwhelmingly for nonmember status des price strong u.s. and israeli opposition, palestinian authority prime minister sa lem fay yesterday is here with us to react today. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama took the show on road today. who are not impressed by the administration's opening budget officer. -- offer. joining me is kristen welker, and luke russert. first to you, the calculus in going to the suburbs of philadelphia, kristen, clearly he feels that the political play right now is better than the inside game that didn't work for him during the super committee negotiations, but can that backfire? >> right now the president feels as though he has a fair amount of leverage having won re-election so he's trying to build momentum on the road. remember, this is a tactic that worked for him during the payroll tax cut fight when he went out, took his case to the american people, so he is doing it once again today in hatfield, pennsylvania, a suburb of philadelphia, speaking at a toymaker and making the case that toymaker would be harmed. consumer confidence beg
. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> there is also word tonight that the u.s. government is actively considering bolder interventions in syria, including directly arming some of the opposition forces. short time ago i talked about that with the former cia officer, bob baer and cnn national security contributor, fran townsend. the u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, confirmed that the obama administration is considering deeper intervention to help the rebels in syria, something that to date, it's been loathe to do. no decision has been made at least not yet, we're told. what do you make of this? it would certainly be a dramatic policy shift. >> it would, wolf, but in some ways, it's too late. it's awfully, there are real consequences to the fact we waited and acted through allies. this has been a real crisis along the turkish border. we worked with our arab allies in saudi arabia and qatar but meanwhile, the vacuum that's been created while the assad regime annihilates its own people, the bloodshed that's taken place, has created this vacuum. the lack of western action,
will derail the biggest economic driver in the u.s. and that is biotech. mike milken talking about life-saving drugs, jobs that come with them and our status as the leader of the industry, all at stake if we go over the fiscal cliff. and dr. francis collins with the national institutes of health. fiscal cliff. folks including today to liz hy malcolmed the month of november and the red and nasdaq and s&p close slightly higher, consumer discretionary and industrials were this month's top performing sectors, utilities and energy lagged behind. oil posting its second straight day of gains closing the trading day up 1%, $80.91 for a barrel of oil and today's gains in crude up 3% for the month of november as concern over threats to supply due to mideast violence offset ongoing demand worries and personal spending, are you part of this, it sold for the first time in five months dropping 0.2%. the commerce department is a debating that to hurricanes and the lowering wages and salaries by an annual rate of $18.2 billion. dave: we may get a dividend bust in the month of december and discuss all o
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
the cause of peace. today the palestinians are turning their back on peace. >> the u.s., of course, agreed with that israeli argument but not many other nations did. only 8, in fact, joining the united states in voting no to recognize ago palestinian state, shep. >> shepard: jonathan, as you mentioned a lot of symbolism there but a practical matter of importance as well when it comes to the international criminal court. >> yeah, this is the practical concern, at least the biggest practical concern here is that by recognizing a palestinian state, that also gives the palestinians access to the international criminal court. and mahmoud abbas pointedly used the phrase war crimes in his speech, an indication that palestinians may well try to bring war crimes charges against israeli generals, all politicians in the international criminal court. if that happens, it is very hard to see. prime minister netanyahu, mahmoud abbas or any of their under lings sitting down for any kind of peace negotiations that is the practical concern tonight, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations for u
. diane fine stein commissioned a report that was looking into u.s. locations that might have been suitable for housing those detainees. >> frustrations boiling over for residents in staten island new york who went to a town hall meeting begging fema for help in the wake of super storm sandy and felt their calls went unanswered. >>>> (inaudible yelling) >> we can nt go nowhere. >> i don't know what's going on here. >> over 700 people were there many couldn't fit into the auditorium. >> the united nations voting to we can niez a palestinian state. -- to recognize a palestinian state. >> thousands of people celebrating in the west bank. general assembly officially changed the palestinian status from u.n. observer to an observer state. >> palestine is not a state. when the u.n. engages in this kind of activity shows a real lack of commitment to stop it from happening. >>> netanyahu says the vote violates past agreements. >> george h.w. bush rapidly improving in the hospital. the 88-year-old was admitted for bronchitis and readmitted the day after thanksgiving. the doctors at the metho
lost more than 40% of their wealth from 2007 to 2010. nearly one in six u.s. residents is officially poor, the highest rate in 50 years. 22% of american children live in poverty. we're facing an economic situation that resembles the years leading up to the great depression. now, this prevailing budget plan calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the -- a president has finally given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker.
, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools and those are religious schools for boys. teachers. there is no teaching force in
from being the u.s. of a to the u.s. of eh. well, folks, i think i found it, fasten your seat belts. and incidentally, if are you wearing seat belts to watch tv, you're part of the problem. >> it sounds preposterous but the united states has to factor into the cold ware to possibly nuke the moon. >> they say the plan call force an intercontinental ballistic missile to be launched from an undisclosed location, travel to the moon and detonate on impact with the height of the cold ware, security scares all around, american leaders felt they needed to give a jolt to the soviet union. >> stephen: we were going to nuke the moon and we didn't! (laughter) this is earth-shattering news. when it should have been moon shattering news. clearly this, this moment is when america stepped back from greatness. oh, let's see, what's the best way to send the rescu rescue-- russ keyes a message. a tense u.s. security council meeting, no, you light up the goddamn moon way nuclear haloso bright kruschev can read pravda at midnight. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: oh, and what milk toast nancy pants pus
, they are eerily similar. here's why. back in september, prudence bushnell, the former u.s. ambassador to kenya at the time of the '98 bombings penned an op-ed in the "new york times" in reaction to the benghazi attack. she wrote, "we must make that work safer. the reasons change, but the human effects are the same. for two years before we were blown up in nairobi, kenya, my team and i thought, nagged was the word the state department colleagues used to have security threats and vulnerablallities assessed. i was told there was no more money for a more secure embassy. just to make sure everyone is following this. let's recap this. back in the late '90s, those in the kenyan embassy were begging the state department for additional security before the bombings, but not given additional resources. does this sound familiar? it gets worse. after the attacks in '98, susan rice was put out by the administration at the time to go on pbs and talk about the attack. we have the tape. watch what she says very closely. >> all of our embassies around the world have received warning of this, notice of this, and
,. >> exactly. >> jennifer: and u.s. corporate profits are at the highest they have been in u.s. history for the third quarter. in u.s. history. >> yes. yes. >> jennifer: all right, so where are the jobs? if the profits are the highest they have been in u.s. history where are the jobs? >> unfortunately, part of the reason that the profits are high, part of it, is that with demand coming back slowly, companies have been able to meet the demand, increase the production with not a lot of additional employment. or with a lot of temporary employment. [speaking at the same time] >> or employment that isn't that expensive to pay for. so basically, they can make profits because they are selling, their prices of what production, their cost of production are not rising as rapidly and therefore they have profits. >> jennifer: so what is going to happen to cause them to reinvest? >> well, i think what we are seeing now is as the economy -- as consumer confidence does pick up as the housing market does pick up, we get more demand.
because the underlying fundamentals in the u.s. economy are clearly improving, and you also have a stabilization or soft landing happening in china at the same time. >> david kelly, what do you want to be doing here? what's your strategy for the fiscal cliff? do you think we go over it, and what do you want to do? >> for a long-term investor, you don't try and play this one. i agree with stephanie about the market probably going higher once they get a resolution. they will get a resolution. it's possible it could go into early january. i still think they're more likely to get a resolution done before the end of the year. either way, they'll get a resolution done. when that happens, then we'll resort to looking at the u.s. economy, which is strengthening a bit here. also, the extreme and relative valuations between high-quality fixed income and equities will push money towards equities. i would not run for cover here because of the volatility. i think you just have to, you know, hold your ground through this and hope that the market moves higher next year. >> bob, this activity at
for the use of military force may be construed to authorize the detention of u.s. citizens or lawful resident aliens who are captured inside the united states unless -- and this is a big "unless" -- an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. as i read the amendment, it says that the military detention of u.s. citizens may be authorized in accordance with the law of war as long as this action is expressly authorized by congress. further, the amendment's requirement for express authorization applies only to the detention of u.s. citizens who are captured inside the united states, so no such authorization would be required for detention of a u.s. citizen in the course of military operations overseas. i believe it is appropriate that congress focus on the issue of military detention at the time that they authorize the use of military force. as would be required by the feinstein amendment. as the supreme court has stated, detention is a fundamental and accepted incident to armed conflict. without such authority, our armed services could be put in the untenable position of being able t
filed for jobless claims. it was the second straight decline. the u.s. labor market has been showing signs of improvement after more hiring and fewer job cuts. >>> on wall street today, the dow is up 36 to 13,021. the nasdaq is up 20 at 3,012. the s&p is up 6 at 1,415. >>> we have just learned that one of last night's powerball winners is expected to come forward tomorrow. the jackpot was $588 million. that is the highest ever for powerball. officials say one ticket was sold in arizona, another in missouri. the winners could each take $192 million before taxes. >>> coming up, california missed out on this jackpot but it won't in the future, powerball is coming to the golden state and who could see a win fall. >>> cheers at the u.n. today as they voted to grant statehood to palestine. [ cheers and applause ] >> the u.n. voted 138-9 to recognize palestine. despite strong opposition from the united states. susan rice said the resolution places further obticles in the path to -- obstacs in the path to peace -- obstacles in the path to peace. >> a new park with a new statues and the perso
this morning on the green ship of our u.s. navy. it's very appropriate that it be here heading the fleet in san francisco. admiral beeman, thank you very much for your leadership. it is impressive what we are accomplishing. just two years ago, we started with an understanding that our military, the coast guard, the u.s. navy, the marine corps, had something that we really needed. it's called logistics expertise. and we recognized that and with the help of our fleet week association, with the help of our honorary chair, former secretary of state george scholtz, along with senator feinstein who started fleet week, we began to appreciate in addition to appreciating the men and women in uniform and the wonderful attributes of having fleet week and the blue angels and the parade of ships, we could also be working on something very important to this city. all across the world there are examples after example and i know the men and women and leadership of the uss macon know this after their tour of duty these past months, all over the world there are disasters and emergencies that we are res
. >>> in a stinging diplomatic defeat for the u.s. and israel, the united nations has voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. in the west bank city of ramallah, hundreds celebrated the vote in the main square. the resolution still won't make palestine a nation, but it is a symbolic victory that palestinians home will strengthen their hand in future peace talks. israel strongly objected to the move, arguing that palestinians must first recognize israel's right to exist before gaining new rights at the u.n. yesterday u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, said the resolution would only delay the peace process. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. today's vote should not be misconstrued by any as constituting eligibility for u.n. membership. it does not. this resolution does not establish that palestine is a state. >> a leading concern for israel is that the palestinians could now use the status to access the u.n.'s international criminal court, pressing it to investigate israel's practices
with recognition. it is a setback for israel and the united states. margaret brennan joins us to tell us why the u.s. voted no. >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie, and to norah. israeli government says it gives palestinians a state without ending the conflict. u.n. recognition makes the west bank and gaza strip part of the palestinian state not defeated territory. without negotiating the borders of one with israel. here is the problem. negotiation negotiations are in a standstill. as we saw last week violent extremists like hamas are gaining influence. palestinian authority, which rejects violence, recognizes israel, is losing influence and patience. last week secretary clinton c s successfully negotiated the cease fire but wasn't able to persuade palestinian president mahmoud abbas to drop this bid. >> margaret, are there consequences for the united states and iz role for this vote? >> reporter: potentially. the concern is that congress could cut off funds to the palestinian authority. the u.s. gave about $495 million in aid last year, which helped keep that peaceful government in power. th
to be coming true in syria. >> warner: quickly, how close is the u.s. to changing its policy at all from what you've been able to discern? >> i think it is on terms of recognizing the government in exile which we -- was formed in doha. in terms of arming the opposition, i'm not sure. it might be something that's been debated to death. there's no action out of the obama administration. we were hoping it was going to happen earlier, it didn't happen and it seems now that the people -- the jihadists and salafists have the arms now including shoulder-fired anti-aircraft systems and the secular forces that came out of the mainstream that we could deal with don't seem to have those weapons and the question is what is the obama administration going to do now? >> warner: tough decision. patrick tabler, thank you. >> my pleasure. >> suarez: still to come on the "newshour": political turmoil in egypt; arizona's new senator; a broad range of steps for a minnesota dance company and the college conference switches. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: democrats an
are drilling ambassador susan rice about the terrorist attacks in benghazi, but why is one u.s. senator now ain't tear gating ir about this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we stilneed your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >> greta: 17. that's how many republican governors are saying no, no to setting up state-run health exchanges mandated by obamacare. arizona governor jan brewer is joining that growing list. good evening, governor. governor, tell me, why have you decided not to s
news. >>> later today the u.s. supreme court may announce if it will review a the challenge to prop 8. coming up the options before the high court and how the city ever san francisco is preparing for the court's decision. >>> time now 5:07. we'll be talking all morning about how dangerous it is driving. you had a scary drive. >> it was really intense. >> tara, what is happening out there now? t's very scary in sonoma county where the flash flood warning is in effect until 5:22 this morning. there is several spinouts reported by chp. really take it easy. especially around big rigs it takes longer for them to brake. let's take live pictures here. this is in pleasanton you can we have all lanes shout down. a big rig crashed spreading debris on the roadway. claudine wong will have an update at 5:30. we're also hearing reports of another big rig accident on this stretch near the altamont pass at the greenville exit. it looks like a truck went down the embankment. this is a look at the bay bridge toll plaza. traffic flowing okay. we do have very wet conditions and a high wind advisory in ef
successfully to defend itself against hamaz rockets. now the u.s. military wants an iron dome of its own. jennifer griffin is live from the pentagon. could the iron dome protect u.s. bases overseas for instance, jennifer? >> reporter: it probably could. the army has a system but it works differently shooting multiple round of bullets rather than missiles at incoming mortars and rockets. missile defense can be very expensive. $90,000 per rocket for instance fired by the iron dome system. yesterday at the pentagon defense secretary panetta received from the defense minister of israel a mold of a tamir missile, part ever the iron dome system that worked so well during the gaza conflict. the u.s. army is investigating buying an iron dome-type system. we already invested $270 million in sealing the dome. they sealed it in record time, three years, despite many skeptics in israel as well as in the pentagon, jon. jon: if we helped fund the system, and our technology, presumably is part of it, why not just buy an iron dome from israel complete? >> reporter: it's a good question. we've learned th
will vote on the draft in two weeks. >>> wow. in syria, as the internet goes dark, a is the u.s. closer to arming the rebels and is time out for bashar al assad? jim clancy is next. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with n
. it was important to the u.s. and israel, they are both withdrawaling aid to the west bank. 138 countries in total backed the palestinians in this. what does this status grant them? >> well, the vote is really a global endorsement of the palestinian position, a palestinian state. it certainly bolsters abbas and the palestinian authority who were weakened. it gives the palestinians hope and a bit of dignity after so many decades of occupation that a state is possible. let's listen to president abass after the vote yesterday. >> translator: we did not come here seeking to delegitimize a state established years ago. that is israel. rather, we came to aform the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve independence, that is palestine. >> as you said, christine, it doesn't give the palestinians anything tangible. the u.s. feels this is a false sense of accomplishment. on the ground, things are going to be exactly the same. susan rice spoke to this a little bit when explaining why the u.s. voted against the measure. take a listen. >> the united states agrees, strongly, today's grand pronouncement will
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